Erdogan, The Antichrist Leader Of Turkey, Is A Major Drug Dealer Who Has Now Made $200 Billion Dollars In Drug Sales. He Is Making The Great Majority Of His Money By Selling Drugs To Americans In The United States, And The Money Is Being Used To Support And Fund ISIS

By Walid Shoebat

In the second part Taleb Ibrahim (if you missed part I click here), a Syrian Middle East analyst who was also a lecturer at the High Institute of National Security in Syria reveals to Shoebat.com some more astonishing analysis regarding the drug dealing that Turkey is involved in. Recep Tyyip Erdogan, according to Ibrahim, has generated up to $200 billion in drug money, and the drug dealings he is involved in go all the way up Mexico. And where has Erdogan made most of his money? The United States. 70% of all of his money comes from drug sales taking place in the US. It is thanks to the hipsters and drug addicts that this antichrist tyrant, Erdogan, is so wealthy and so successful in making money out of narcotics. The drugs are made up of opiates originating in Afghanistan that lands in the United States. Talib also shares with us how ISIS does not depend on oil for its survival but on the drug trafficking empire 70% of which is consumed in the United States via Mexico. We also look at daily reports of the supposed oil exports by ISIS:

Taleb-Ibrahim-Syria-Aljazeera-TV

Taleb Ibrahim on Al-Jazeera

ISIS does not survive from selling oil but is also involved with Turkey which manages and facilitates the drug silk road from Afghanistan then travels by arrangement of Turkish authority through strange paths reaching to Mexico then to the United States which is managed by U.S. NATO ally the government of Turkey. Here is part II (if you missed part I click here):

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  • John Galt

    “It is thanks to the hipsters and drug addicts that he is so wealthy.”

    Oh please! It’s because drugs are ILLEGAL that he is so wealthy. These evil monsters enrich themselves from the WAR on drugs, not the drugs themselves. Ask yourself this: is Ergodan smuggling alcohol into the US? Are mexican cartels smuggling alcohol? No, they only profit from illegal things. Case in point: mobsters and prohibition. If you legalize the drugs he’s selling, he can’t make money. If you think drugs should be illegal, then YOU are responsible for enriching the likes of Ergodan, El Chapo, and every criminal gang out there.

    If he is making money off US drug sales, then let him compete with tax paying, domestic pharmaceutical companies and see how long he keeps that up. When will the anti drug monsters stop funneling money to these evil, violent people??

    • susan

      Tax anything high enough and they’ll smuggle it and/or grow or make it themselves. Did making alcohol legal prevent alcoholism?

      • John Galt

        Alcoholism existed independent of prohibition, proving you can’t fight addiction with law.

        On the other hand, the amount of money being made by violent mobsters was directly related to prohibition. The war on drugs is the same. Make it illegal, violence increases. Make it legal, violence decreases.

        So I am concerned with violence.

        • susan

          Well, let’s just get rid of money. I am concerned with white collar crime.

        • OrthodoxKGC2015

          Look, it’s obvious with a name like ‘John Galt’ where you’re coming from philosophically, lol. I’m not intending to start a fight, but are you a Christian? An Objectivist? A Christian Objectivist? I am just curious because I’ve read some very clever people who make a good attempt to square that circle.

          I am ‘reactionary’ in many ways some might think, but like my mentor Fyodor Dostievsky, I am a big believer in liberty and freedom.

          ‘Monarchist Libertarian’? Yeah, that’s the circle I managed to square.

          • John Galt

            I was raised “non practicing Catholic.” In college I became an Objectivist and (regrettably) an Atheist. Out of desperation involving a very serious health crisis with my wife about 5 years ago, I decided to try reading the Bible. I started with Genesis and finished with Revelation. At first I did not believe it, yet immediately recognized the wisdom in what it says. After I got to a certain point in the Bible, I started to see how that wisdom pointed to the existence of God. I eventually re-read it to gain a better understanding, as well as some CS Lewis and others, and recognized how incredibly rational the Bible actually is, and how it’s far more insightful about human nature than any psychologist could hope to be.

            While the two are clearly incompatible in many areas, there are certain areas of overlap. For example, the existence of private property, and the role of government (e.g. socialism). Basically the core of Objectivism is simply to use reason and evidence (not faith) to find truth and pursue happiness.

            As a “baby Christian” or an unbeliever you don’t have faith. You “need” God to reach out and get you. The Bible provides that initial evidence while explaining how faith is rational. Faith is also a universal truth; at the most basic level, you must have faith in your own perceptions, so Objectivism is clearly flawed in its rejection of faith of any kind.

            The Bible is amazingly rational, and commands that you conform your mind to truth, which is entirely compatible with Objectivism.

            Regarding the pursuit of happiness, clearly people can be tricked into thinking something is making them happy. The Bible again comes to the rescue and explains why your ultimate happiness lies in rejecting that deceptive “short-term” thing that you think makes you happy. Objectivism stops with that short-term happiness and doesn’t grasp this very wise point.

            Those are a few of the more contentious points in the Christian vs. Objectivist debate, but I could go on and on. But just like any insightful Greek or Roman philosopher, there is value in their writings, to the extent they “grasp at truth,” while rejecting their numerous errors.

            By the way, Dostoevsky is one of my favorite authors. I assume you’ve read two of my favorite books: Crime & Punishment and The Brothers Karamazov? 🙂

          • OrthodoxKGC2015

            Thank you for your reply, very insightful! I have read an have both of those novels of Dostoevsky, and most of his other works like ‘the Idiot’ and ‘The Possessed’.

    • Grandmere

      That attitude only works until you are paying for re-hab for your spouse or child. When you cash out that 401K, legalization of drugs wont seem like a good idea.

      • John Galt

        Not true. People have this misconception that if drugs were legal everyone would be high all the time. Addiction studies indicate that is only true of 10% of the population.

        And you talk about my spouse or child, yet what destroys families more than locking up nonviolent fathers (and mothers)? The war on drugs is a war on families. You think legalizing drugs will put my family in rehab, but outlawing drugs will put them in prison (even if I agreed with your premise, which is worse).

        I for one don’t want families broken up, especially for something so absurd as “you treated your medical condition in a non-government approved way.”

        • susan

          Why is it one or the other? I’ve met quite a few thieves in jail as well. Maybe we should get rid of tvs and money.

        • susan

          John, whether a corporation or the government or the taxman or the enterprenur sells the drugs—the addiction rate with heroin is high. Whether they go to prison for stealing things to sell for money to buy drugs, they still go to prison. Maybe we should legalize drugs, legalize stealing and use the prisons for people who complain about it. 😉

          • John Galt

            Your example of heroin is fitting. The vast majority of new heroin addicts are on it because their pills got taken away. So anti drug policy pushed people from something only moderately dangerous to something incredibly dangerous. Law enforcement knew the “unintended consequences” of pill crackdowns but they didn’t care. They took a public nuisance and turned it into a crisis. I’d say THAT is the real evil.

            And mist drug users are not thieves. Any theft you are referring to is probably due to the fact that none of them can get jobs with a nonviolent felony drug conviction. The war on drugs strikes again!

          • susan

            I’m not sure why you’re blaming law enforcement. A decrease in pills is why heroin use is increasing? Hmmm. That’s not been my experience.

          • richinnameonly

            I agree.
            If new scrolls are opened during the thousand year reign, I just don’t think that one will declare all drug use be legalized or encouraged. But then we will have an environment much different from today and the drug temptation may not exist.

          • richinnameonly

            I’ve known quite a few people who have been on heroin and none of them started because pills were taken away. They started because they were curious about an unbelievable feeling someone told them they would get. They thought they could just try it for the experience and put it down. Unfortunately, it didn’t work the way they thought it would.

          • John Galt

            Can you at least see how a person getting cut off from an opiate Rx will resort to “anything” else to dull the pain? Especially a cheaper, more accessible opiate like heroin? I find it absurd that the end result of pill mill crackdowns is that heroin is easier to get and more plentiful than opiate meds. I seriously question the motives (or competence) of the anti drug crowd when that is the end result of their policies.

          • susan

            Where are you buying your heroin?

          • John Galt

            Seriously? Now you’re just being obtuse.

          • susan

            I’m sorry. It was a sincere question. If you’re not familiar with the average cost of a persons habit then why should i listen to you?

          • John Galt

            I don’t do heroin. I used to live in an area ravaged by heroin, but since moved away. The anti-drug crowd took a manageable problem of dealing with pills and unleashed a much worse monster in my area. I personally observed it. The problem is now worse because of anti-drug meddling. My personal experience tells me they are either corrupt or incompetent.

          • susan

            Ok. Let’s put everything aside and do as you say. Legalization and no prison time. Are we going to subsidize heroin so it’s affordable for those unable to work because they’re high? What about housing? Food? Healthcare? Utilities? Babysitters?

          • richinnameonly

            There needs to be more doctors and medications available to people that really need an opiate or other pain killer. Right now the methadone and suboxone systems are too difficult, expensive and “iffy” to work well. It’s just like the mental health system, totally inadequate. But I’m not for legalizing everything as I think it would ruin more lives. When I was in high school in NY a long, long time ago, there were drugs around. My crowd knew all about them, dabbled, but knew the ones to stay away from because you just may fall to it, which others did. Fast forward to my son’s generation and it seems young people have gotten more naive and there are more and stronger drugs available. That combination has decimated his contemporaries. Not one of them started because they needed a pain killer for a bad back or something similar. They all started looking for a thrill, rubbing elbows with the wrong people, and thinking that they were different and would not get ruined. I can see the other side of the argument John, but I’ve been personally effected too much by all of this to want to put more into the hands of people that don’t really need them.

          • John Galt

            I do agree with some of what you say, especially regarding inadequate mental health services. I also firmly believe that medical science simply doesn’t understand pain in the human body. I’ve seen unsympathetic doctors kick people to the curb, labeling them “drug seekers.” Then watching those people resort to desperate solutions because the safe solution was denied to them. Better mental health, and more research (I think) will yield far better results than using force. But at least we have some agreement. 🙂

          • richinnameonly

            Yes sir. The whole realm of mental, psychological, emotional, neurological, etc. is very difficult. If someone gets a deep gash, it gets stitched and heals. Purely physical. When the mind, emotions, synapses are involved it gets really sticky.

        • Beth

          1 Peter 5:8 – Be sober, be vigilant; because your adversary the devil, as a roaring lion, walketh about, seeking whom he may devour

          • John Galt

            You are exactly right, beth. But notice I didn’t advocate the use of drugs other than to treat an illness. Also notice that your referenced passage does not advocate the use of armed force against those that are not sober.

        • Bilbo

          Drug usage was not illegal in the US until the 20th century. You just couldn’t get welfare of any sort if you were an addict.

          I find it interesting that the government promotion and distribution of drugs, hand in hand with anti drug laws and stiff prison sentences, and the implementation of the welfare state, coincide with the timeline of the Marxization of America, the academic Marxist revolution of the early 20th century, and the 1948 decision for separation of church and state by a SCOTUS that was comprised of now-grown up Marxist revolutionary former law students. Am I a conspiracy theorist if I state that this has all been fueled and financed by the Rothschilds and Rockefellers, two eugenicist empires?

  • Lidia

    The EU is putting pressure on Serbia to recognize Kosovo as an independent country. Kosovo has been helping Turkey with their drug trade big time. That was problably one of the reasons for the break up of Kosovo from Yugoslavia. The other reason was for the U.S. to build their military base there so they can spy on Russia better. The U.S. will of course ignore the drug activities there in Kosovo. It was part of the deal.

  • susan

    Great article Walid. He addressed many important pieces. The CIA, erdogan, oil demand vs supply for Isis’ use, the pilot from Jordan and who really shot him down and why he was killed….and the woman they freed. Let’s hope these points don’t get lost in the ongoing drug debate.

  • Trevor

    This would be a good time for me to remind folks that in Revelation, the word “witchcraft” is actually “pharmakeia,” where we get the word pharmacy in English.

    Here are the passage straight from Revelation 18:23, ” and the light of a lamp will not shine in you any longer; and the voice of the bridegroom and bride will not be heard in you any longer; for your merchants were the great men of the earth, because all the nations were deceived by your sorcery [pharmakeia].”

    Is it any wonder, then, that a great number of people who have claimed to have visitation from the “great beyond” are done while being high on drugs? Food for thoughts.

  • Jennifer

    Walid, wow….the treachery and corruption runs so deep…. Lord only knows what’s next to be revealed. There are somedays when I wish ignorance was bliss but unfortunately it isn’t.

  • 1Bobby8

    Attention swill heads; you are funding and supporting the anti-Christ, and funding and supporting ISIS.

  • John Galt

    I actually agree with you. Economics 101: people will make money on it whether it’s legal or not! Precisely why it should be legal. When was the last time Coors blew up a Budweiser bottling plant? Never? That’s because alcohol is legal. Now when was the last time drug cartel A killed all the members of drug cartel B. Yesterday? The only difference is the legality. People will sell drugs and use them independent of the law. The only difference is prohibition comes with a side of violence. So the money can either go to nonviolent suppliers or violent suppliers, which seems to be the very point you are making.

    So the real moral argument is to stop anti-drug fueled violence.

  • Trevor

    Thank you, Beth.

  • John Galt

    No Beth, not at all! They are horribly violent, immoral animals. Many cartel members are just one step below ISIS in their violence. What I’m saying is that those people are empowered by the war on drugs. The only reason they are millionaires is because prohibition creates the circumstances that allow them to reap massive profits.

    My moral argument is that, the war on drugs effectively funnels millions of dollars to violent people. The more money they have, the more violence they can commit. Legalizing drugs reduces their profit margins, by redirecting that money to nonviolent suppliers.

    The anti drug crowd is focused exclusively on addiction, which is a legitimate medical (not legal) concern. Whereas the legalization crowd is focused on the violence, which I consider to have a higher moral imperative.

    • Bilbo

      Don’t forget that our CIA ran drugs to the inner cities as a eugenics genocide on the black population, and that the DEA admits to running interference for the Mexican cartels’ drug pipeline to the US.

      The War on Drugs is a war being fought by nefarious government agencies against We the People.

  • Eric Mueller

    Hmmm, Interesting! : – )

  • Bilbo

    Don’t forget that, since 9/11n The US has given 10s of millions to the Afghan poppy industry, and that opium production is up 3800% since then. The DEA admits to protecting the Mexican cartel pipeline directly to Chicago.

    My wife pointed to me years ago in the early 80s that she felt the star Wormwood in Revelation 8:11 was the coming drug addiction of 1/3 of the world. In the mid 90s she found out that absinthe, an addictive opioid analog (found in Jagermeister and to which Edgar Allen Poe was addicted), comes from the processing of the bitter herb wormwood. She feels that this opium overload is a biblical fulfillment of Revelation 8:11, and I think she’s right on.

  • susan

    Very true.

  • John Galt

    Yes, and Gallop revealed that the people of Singapore are the most unhappy in the world (even topping Syria). That’s what happens when you live in a brutal police state that executes people for nonviolent drug offences. I’ll stick with my U.S. Constitution, and keep my happiness, thank you very much!

  • John Galt

    History would say otherwise. Opium was sold just like any other product for thousands of years and society didn’t collapse.

  • Bilbo

    You’re one dimensional.

  • John Galt

    I’m not suggesting that use of opium is good or even “not dangerous.” I’m saying that interference by the State invariably makes the problem worse because it’s an improper use of force. Don’t you see the irony in your reference to China? State confiscation of huge amounts of private property (opium) led to full blown war in which many people died. Even back then, the anti-drug crowd resorts to violence and accepts death as the preferable outcome to simple, treatable medical problems.

    You mention that when it was legal, Christian ethics was effective in preventing people from engaging in that form of excess. So history proves my point that Jesus Christ is a far superior and more effective way to fight addiction than any state-sponsored use of force. Do not be so quick to resort to violence, rely on the Word of God instead, history proves it!

  • susan

    What’s your solution? Or are you still nothing but a complainer? 😉

  • John Galt

    Then please educate me. What is the correct interpretation of that verse? It seems clear to me, but I absolutely don’t want to misinterpret.

  • John Galt

    Thank you for the thoughtful response, Beth. I agree with what you said. I have not advocated that drunkenness is ok. My argument has more to do with the proper way to address something that we both agree is evil. I don’t think using force against a drug addict is very compassionate. I also know that making drugs illegal generates a lot of violence. And many truly sick people are denied medication they really need, which is why I cited proverbs. You may disagree with the following statement, but God created marijuana and opium for a reason. I think there is a proper (medical) use for these plants that we should accept, rather than rejecting God’s creation outright. Many people on heroin should be getting safer pain meds for legitimate conditions. Because they are denied access, they resort to worse things and destroy themselves.

    So in our effort to prevent drunkeness, we have unleashed far worse problems. That’s ultimately my whole point. Like many many things in society, this fight should be fought through churches and hospitals, not through government force. Thank you again and God bless!